December

From my family to yours, I wish you a very happy and healthy Holiday Season. Here are some tips to help keep our families safe during the holidays:


Taken directly from: http://www.nsc.org/learn/safety-knowledge/Pages/news-and-resources-holiday-safety.aspx

It's Better to Give ... Safely

We've all heard it's important when choosing toys for infants or small children to avoid small parts that might prove to be a choking hazard. Here are some additional gift-related safety tips:

Watch Out for those Fire-starters

Candles and Fireplaces


Thousands of deaths are caused by fires, burns and other fire-related injuries every year, and 12% of home candle fires occur in December, the National Fire Protection Association reports. Increased use of candles and fireplaces, combined with an increase in the amount of combustible, seasonal decorations present in many homes means more risk for fire.

  • Never leave burning candles unattended or sleep in a room with a lit candle

  • Keep candles out of reach of children

  • Make sure candles are on stable surfaces

  • Don't burn candles near trees, curtains or any other flammable items

  • Don't burn trees, wreaths or wrapping paper in the fireplace

  • Check and clean the chimney and fireplace area at least once a year

Don't Give the Gift of Food Poisoning

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provides some holiday food safety tips. Here are a few:

  • Do not rinse raw meat and poultry before cooking

  • Use a food thermometer to make sure meat is cooked to a safe temperature

  • Refrigerate food within two hours

  • Thanksgiving leftovers are safe for four days in the refrigerator

  • Bring sauces, soups and gravies to a rolling boil when reheating

  • When storing turkey, cut the leftovers in small pieces so they will chill quickly

  • Wash your hands frequently when handling food

Traveling for the Holidays? Be Prepared

Many people choose to travel during the holidays by automobile, with the highest fatality rate of any major form of transportation. In 2013, 343 people died on New Year's Day, 360 on Thanksgiving Day and 88 on Christmas Day, according to Injury Facts 2015. Alcohol-impaired fatalities represented 31% of the totals.


Remember, when guests are staying in your home, make sure areas have night lights or easy-to-reach lamps in case they need to get up during the night. And, whether you are visiting someone else's home or you have guests in your home, make sure all medications are kept up and away and out of sight from young children.




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